Video Art Archives

Electronic Arts Intermix – eai.org

Founded in 1971, Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is a nonprofit arts organization that is a leading international resource for video and media art. A pioneering advocate for media art and artists, EAI’s core program is the distribution and preservation of a major collection of over 3,500 new and historical video works by artists. For 40 years, EAI has fostered the creation, exhibition, distribution and preservation of video art, and more recently, digital art projects.

Video Data Bank – http://vdb.org/

Founded at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 1976 at the inception of the media arts movement, the Video Data Bank (VDB) is a leading resource in the United States for video by and about contemporary artists. The VDB Collections include the work of more than 550 artists and 6,000 video art titles, 2,500+ in active distribution.

LUXhttp://www.lux.org.uk/

Founded in 2002 as a charity and not-for-profit limited company, it builds on a lineage of predecessororganisations (The London Filmmakers Co-operative, London Video Arts and The Lux Centre) which stretches back to the 1960s. LUX is the only organisation of its kind in the UK, it represents the country’s only significant collection of artists’ film and video and is the largest distributor of such work in Europe (representing 4500 works by approximately 1500 artists from 1920s to the present day). LUX works with a large number of major institutions including museums, galleries, festivals and educational establishments, as well as directly with the public and artists. LUX receives regular revenue funding from Arts Council England.

National Film Board of Canada – http://www.nfb.ca/

The National Film Board of Canada’s award-winning online Screening Room, featuring over 2,000 filmsexcerptstrailers and interactive works. The NFB is working to digitize its entire collection of over 13,000 titles, to make these works accessible as never before and preserve them for the future. This work was begun in 2001 with the help of Canadian Culture Online, a program of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

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New Media Art Archives

Rhizome ArtBase –   http://rhizome.org/artbase

Founded in 1999, the Rhizome ArtBase is an online archive of new media art containing some 2139 art works, and growing. The ArtBase encompasses a vast range of project by artists all over the world that employ materials such as software, code, websites, moving images, games and browsers to aesthetics and critical ends. We welcome submissions to the ArtBase; they are reviewed by our curatorial staff on a monthly basis


Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art  http://goldsen.library.cornell.edu/

Under the sponsorship of The Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art serves as a research repository of new media art and resources. The curatorial vision emphasizes digital interfaces and artistic experimentation by international, independent artists. Designed as an experimental center of research and creativity, the Goldsen Archive includes materials by individual artists and collaborates on conceptual experimentation and archival strategies with international curatorial and fellowship projects.


Banff New Media Institute Program Archive  http://www.banffcentre.ca/bnmi/programs/archives/

Media Research at The Banff Centre began with the establishment of the Banff New Media Institute (BNMI) in 1995. The BNMI developed to become an internationally respected arts production and research institute, with programs designed to support creative pluralism, different modes of inquiry, the production of new work, and the engagement of artists, producers, technologists, and researchers with the aesthetics and culture of new media.

Turbulence –  http://turbulence.org/

Turbulence is a project of New Radio and Performing Arts, Inc. (NRPA). Now celebrating 15 years, Turbulence has commissioned over 200 works and exhibited and promoted artists’ work through its Artists Studios, Guest Curator, and Spotlight sections. As networking technologies have developed wireless capabilities and become mobile, Turbulence has remained at the forefront of the field by commissioning, exhibiting, and archiving the new hybrid networked art forms that have emerged. Turbulence works have been included in the Whitney Museum of American Art’s Biennial (’00, ’02, ’04), and its Bit Streams and Data Dynamics exhibitions; Total Museum of Contemporary Art, Korea; C-Theory, Cornell University; Ars Electronica, Austria; International Festival of New Cinema and New Media, Montreal; European Media Arts Festival, Germany; and the Sundance Film Festival, among others.

Turbulence.org is in the process of being archived at the Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. The project is discussed in Virtueel Platform Research: Archiving the Digital by Annet Dekker and Rachel Somers-Miles.

Art and Electronic Media Online Companion – http://www.artelectronicmedia.com/

 

This dynamic resource complements Edward Shanken’s book Art and Electronic Media (Phaidon, 2009). The growing number of images, videos, texts, and links provided here offer additional information and multimedia documentation about work by individuals, groups, and institutions that have made valuable contributions to the discourses of electronic art. The site follows the book’s organization in seven thematic streams but can also be searched by keyword and tag-cloud links. You don’t need to register to explore content but registered users can access a rich interface to submit entries that will be considered for publication. Additional functionality and content are under development, and your contributions to that process are welcome. We hope that this resource will assist in the process of teaching and learning and are grateful for your submissions and feedback.

Software Art Archive

Runme.org http://www.runme.org/

Runme.org is a software art repository, launched in January 2003. It is an open, moderated database to which people are welcome to submit projects they consider to be interesting examples of software art.

Software art is an intersection of two almost non-overlapping realms: software and art. It has a different meaning and aura in each. Software art gets its lifeblood and its techniques from living software culture and represents approaches and strategies similar to those used in the art world.