Video Art Archives

Electronic Arts Intermix – eai.org

Founded in 1971, Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI) is a nonprofit arts organization that is a leading international resource for video and media art. A pioneering advocate for media art and artists, EAI’s core program is the distribution and preservation of a major collection of over 3,500 new and historical video works by artists. For 40 years, EAI has fostered the creation, exhibition, distribution and preservation of video art, and more recently, digital art projects.

Video Data Bank – http://vdb.org/

Founded at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 1976 at the inception of the media arts movement, the Video Data Bank (VDB) is a leading resource in the United States for video by and about contemporary artists. The VDB Collections include the work of more than 550 artists and 6,000 video art titles, 2,500+ in active distribution.

LUXhttp://www.lux.org.uk/

Founded in 2002 as a charity and not-for-profit limited company, it builds on a lineage of predecessororganisations (The London Filmmakers Co-operative, London Video Arts and The Lux Centre) which stretches back to the 1960s. LUX is the only organisation of its kind in the UK, it represents the country’s only significant collection of artists’ film and video and is the largest distributor of such work in Europe (representing 4500 works by approximately 1500 artists from 1920s to the present day). LUX works with a large number of major institutions including museums, galleries, festivals and educational establishments, as well as directly with the public and artists. LUX receives regular revenue funding from Arts Council England.

National Film Board of Canada – http://www.nfb.ca/

The National Film Board of Canada’s award-winning online Screening Room, featuring over 2,000 filmsexcerptstrailers and interactive works. The NFB is working to digitize its entire collection of over 13,000 titles, to make these works accessible as never before and preserve them for the future. This work was begun in 2001 with the help of Canadian Culture Online, a program of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

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